Though green tea is not caffeine rich, it does contain around 25 to 50 mg of caffeine in a cup. The green tea contains EGCG or epigallocatechin gallate. This boosts the metabolism. It also leads to powerful antioxidant properties supporting the norepinephrine in the brain sending signals to the body to break down fat cells and use fat which is on your body for energy. Consuming green tea along with exercise is the perfect way to burn your belly fat.
That’s because women tend to store more temporary fat in their bellies. “The fat stores are gained and lost,” says Lawrence Cheskin, MD, chair of the department of nutrition and food studies at George Mason University and director of the Johns Hopkins Weight Management Center. “By and large, belly fat comes off easier in the sense that it comes off first. That’s where a good amount of the fat is lost from.”
Plus, a 2015 study from the Annals of Internal Medicine showed that for those who have a hard time following a strict diet, simplifying the weight loss approach by just increasing fiber intake can still lead to weight loss. Women should aim for at least 25 grams of fiber per day (based on a 2,000-calorie) diet, according to the most recent U.S. Dietary Guidelines. Not sure where to start? Check out our step-by-step guide to increasing your fiber intake.
Sure, ketchup is tasty, but it’s also a serious saboteur when it comes your weight loss efforts. Ketchup is loaded with sugar — up to four grams per tablespoon — and bears little nutritional resemblance to the fruit from which it’s derived. Luckily, swapping out your ketchup for salsa can help you shave off that belly fat at home without a diet. Fresh tomatoes, like those used in salsa, are loaded with lycopene, which a study conducted at China Medical University in Taiwan links to reductions in both overall fat and waist circumference. If you like your salsa spicy, all the better; the capsaicin in hot peppers, like jalapeños and chipotles, can boost your metabolism, too.

Red is one of the best colors for weight loss. That’s because the color is due to higher levels of nutrients called flavonoids—particularly anthocyanins—which calm the action of fat-storage genes, according to Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity research. In fact, red-bellied stone fruits like plums boast phenolic compounds that have been shown to “turn off” fat genes. Plus, their pectin—a gelatin-like type of fiber found in the cell walls of fruits—limits the amount of fat your cells can absorb, as shown by a Nutrition & Metabolism study.
This classic lunchbox sandwich condiment is teeming with flat-belly nutrients such as cholesterol-lowering monounsaturated fats and is a great source of plant-based protein. According to a recent study presented at the annual Society for Endocrinology conference, researchers found that when protein is digested and broken down into amino acids in your body, one of those amino acids—phenylalanine—triggers hormones that help reduce appetite and ultimately leads to fat burn and weight loss. Go for brands that have an ingredient list of just two items: nuts and a little salt, or look to our guide: Best and Worst Peanut Butters.
Legumes provide plant-based lean protein. Protein takes longer to digest, thereby burning more calories, according to Fat Free Kitchen. Eating a bowl of bean soup for dinner or having a bean salad can help burn calories during sleeping hours. Legumes include lentils, split peas and varieties of beans. Beans include dried and/or canned kidney, black, navy, white, red, chickpeas or garbanzos, great northern and lima varieties.
This dairy product is perfect for eating to lose weight. Moderation for those who are not lactose intolerant helps to stick to full fat varieties such as cheese, butter and cream because they are rich in vitamin K2 drastically reducing chances of a cardiac issue. Stay away from low fat dairy as the high level of processing and sugars make it unviable for fat loss.
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