Don’t let extra hours lounging in bed stand between you and a flatter stomach. While getting enough sleep can help boost your metabolic rate, sleeping in may undo any benefit you’d enjoy from catching a few extra winks. One Obesity study reveals that late sleepers who snoozed past 10:45 in the morning ate nearly 250 more calories over the course of the day, despite eating half as many fruits and vegetables as their early bird counterparts. Even worse, they chowed down on more salty, sugary, and trans-fat-laden fast food than those who woke up earlier. If you happen to head out of the house early, you’re in for an additional metabolic boost; researchers at Northwestern University have found that people exposed to just a short period of early morning sunlight had lower BMIs than their late-waking counterparts.

Agree with all the choices except one, SOYBEANS sadly the soybeans even from 50 years ago are different than the ones now, virtually almost all are GMC’s. Bad things can happen if ingested more than twice a week, for men excess estrogen which can lead to developing breasts etc, for women breast cancer is much more common. Fermenting them is the only way to solve the problem.
Want to lose that belly fat fast? In your dreams! Seriously, though: a good night’s sleep is one of the best ways to get rid of that extra fat around your waist for good. Among the 60,000 women participating in the Nurses’ Health Study, those who snoozed for fewer than five hours a night were at the greatest risk of becoming obese and gaining 30 or more pounds over the course of the 16-year study period when compared to those who slept for seven or more hours.
This is a top quality protein source that lowers body fat and leads to maintenance of muscle mass. High quality protein is perfect for supporting weight because it contains amino acid leucine. This amino acid cuts down the calories and builds muscles. If compared to fats or carbs, proteins promote greater satiety. It helps in cravings as well. Protein is perfect for reducing cravings and improving the desire for snacks. Increasing protein intake has been a process for the ability to reduce cravings drastically and snacking at night. Protein has thermogenic properties which burn calories the food contains during the digestion.
Another reason is the genetic factor. In case obesity runs in the genes, it will take place and it cannot be helped. Excessive calorific intake transforms into fat and calories, so the more junk food you eat, the fatter you get. Stress is another indicator of belly fat accumulation. As it is human nature to eat more during stressful times, this tends to add up the calorific intake. Another factor influencing belly fat is a lack of sleep which results in the gas formation and puffing up of the belly.
Say cheese! Adding some extra calcium and vitamin D to your diet could be the best way to get the flat stomach you’ve been dreaming about. Over just 12 months, researchers at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville found that obese female study subjects who upped their calcium intake shed 11 pounds of body fat without other major dietary modifications. To keep your calcium choices healthy, try mixing it up between dairy sources, calcium-rich leafy greens, fatty fish, nuts, and seeds.
Don’t let extra hours lounging in bed stand between you and a flatter stomach. While getting enough sleep can help boost your metabolic rate, sleeping in may undo any benefit you’d enjoy from catching a few extra winks. One Obesity study reveals that late sleepers who snoozed past 10:45 in the morning ate nearly 250 more calories over the course of the day, despite eating half as many fruits and vegetables as their early bird counterparts. Even worse, they chowed down on more salty, sugary, and trans-fat-laden fast food than those who woke up earlier. If you happen to head out of the house early, you’re in for an additional metabolic boost; researchers at Northwestern University have found that people exposed to just a short period of early morning sunlight had lower BMIs than their late-waking counterparts.
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