While few would suggest you start hitting up the tanning beds for better health, getting some natural sunlight can help you get rid of belly fat in a matter of weeks. Researchers at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center found that vitamin D-deficient overweight women between 50 and 75 who upped their intake of the so-called sunshine vitamin shed more weight and body fat than those who didn’t. To practice safe sun, make sure you’re limiting yourself to 15 sunscreen-free minutes per day.
A handful of almonds packs a serious fat-burning punch: One International Journal Of Obesity and Related Metabolic Disorders study of overweight adults found that eating about a quarter-cup of almonds for 6 months led to a 62 percent greater reduction in weight and BMI, thanks to a compound that limits the fat absorbed by the body. And eating just 1.5 ounces of almonds daily led to a reduction in belly and leg fat, a 2015 study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association showed. For added effect, eat almonds before working out: The amino acid L-arginine can help you burn more fat while building muscle.
Fish is high in omega-3s. The deficiency of omega-3s in your daily diet will make your pineal gland in the brain that helps you in regulating your nervous system be thrown off. Therefore, it leads to many changes in the production of melatonin – a sleep hormone. People who lack omega-3 cannot sleep in their usual rest time and thereby leading to some unhealthy habits such as late-night eating or staying at night, etc.
This creates satisfaction and satiates the cravings for fast food, ensuring that you are full longer with fiber and high protein. It improves the metabolism to burn more calories across the day. Buy peanut butter from peanuts alone. Look for unprocessed freshly ground butter loaded with niacin that keeps the digestive system at optimal levels and prevents belly fat.

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